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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 9:46 PM on December 26, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: com, music, , Myspace Layout, , , , space, spice   

    Myspace Layout Ideas for Skateboarders

    Myspace.com has made some serious waves on the internet, offering thousands of people their own free sites where they can keep in touch with old buddies, find new friends, tell other people about themselves, and pretty much write the stories of their own lives.

    Myspace has got areas for people in general just looking to meet new faces and exchange thoughts with others, but it also has its own little communities where people who have similar hobbies and interests can sit together and jam on forums. Some of the niche groups in myspace, for example, deal with skateboarding, and a lot of passionate skateboarders worldwide have joined myspace to meet with others of like hearts and minds.

    If you’re a dedicated skateboarder and want to get in touch with your kindred spirits then try your hand at making your own entry at Myspace.com. Designing your own space is easy – there are dozens of reliable sources online where you can download codes, layouts, graphics, and music to spice up your personal page. Some of these are even dedicated to providing skateboarders with some good layouts for their myspace page.

    However as any artist knows, just having the stuff to work with isn’t enough. You have to get creative and put your soul into something if you want people to stand up and take notice. Here are a few tips I mugged from friends who not only skateboard but do other stuff like music and graphics design. Maybe these examples will help you out, and spark your creative juices too.

    Graphic Ideas – a webpage without graphics is a cake without icing, cherries, and chocolate flakes. Just plain boring. Whether it’s a picture of you and your girl set as the background, a splash of your favorite movie or anime character, or a photo of your beloved skateboard, your opening page has got to tell people who you are at a glance. As an example of creativity, one of my friends in the karate club used a picture for his background where he was the victim of a kick that literally sent him off the ground. Painful, but amusing to see. Another of my buddies did a self portrait charcoal sketch and scanned it for his space. If you can draw, paint, or do computer graphics you can do a lot in this department.

    Music, Baby! – there’s a saying that Life Has a Soundtrack. Aside from the tunes you stick in your car when driving or in your CD player when you’re ripping on your skateboard, there are those tunes that just seem to play in the background from somewhere when Wierd Things happen in your life… If you know what I’m talking about, then this is one area where you can spice up the layout of your myspace page.

    Photo and Video Galleries – this is where you can start getting funky. Setting up several photo galleries give people an insight into who you are and what you do. Some of the stuff I’ve seen my friends do include the following: Winning shots of all his skateboarding stunts and competitions, a Bloopers gallery showing every crash and burn on a board, a Skateboard collection (all of them personally tricked up and spraypainted with awesome designs), even a Tattoo Art gallery for one of our gang who skateboards, surfs, and owns a tattoo parlor down in the beach.

    Blog your Stuff – lastly, this is the modern version of those cheesy leatherbound diaries we see distinguished gentlemen and genteel ladies use in those old movies. In the modern age, we blog stuff. Jot your experiences and ideas here from day to day, and your brain’s caffeine level is probably the only real limit to what you put here. You can rant, you can rave, you can brag about your latest accomplishments or post questions that your viewers may have an answer to (or a wisecrack, but them’s the breaks!). Some layouts for myspace also allow you to set up surveys for your friends to answer when they visit your page, allowing you to twist people’s heads up with strange questions that are best pondered when intoxicated…

     

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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 11:20 PM on December 25, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , mental processes, , , Tennis psychology,   

    General Tennis Pshology

    Tennis psychology is nothing more than understanding the workings of your opponent’s mind, and gauging the effect of your own game on his mental viewpoint, and understanding the mental effects resulting from the various external causes on your own mind. You cannot be a successful psychologist of others without first understanding your own mental processes, you must study the effect on yourself of the same happening under different circumstances. You react differently in different moods and under different conditions. You must realize the effect on your game of the resulting irritation, pleasure, confusion, or whatever form your reaction takes. Does it increase your efficiency? If so, strive for it, but never give it to your opponent.

    Does it deprive you of concentration? If so, either remove the cause, or if that is not possible strive to ignore it.

    Once you have judged accurately your own reaction to conditions, study your opponents, to decide their temperaments. Like temperaments react similarly, and you may judge men of your own type by yourself. Opposite temperaments you must seek to compare with people whose reactions you know.

    A person who can control his own mental processes stands an excellent chance of reading those of another, for the human mind works along definite lines of thought, and can be studied. One can only control one’s, mental processes after carefully studying them.

    A steady phlegmatic baseline player is seldom a keen thinker. If he was he would not adhere to the baseline.

    The physical appearance of a man is usually a pretty clear index to his type of mind. The stolid, easy-going man, who usually advocates the baseline game, does so because he hates to stir up his torpid mind to think out a safe method of reaching the net. There is the other type of baseline player, who prefers to remain on the back of the court while directing an attack intended to break up your game. He is a very dangerous player, and a deep, keen thinking antagonist. He achieves his results by mixing up his length and direction, and worrying you with the variety of his game. He is a good psychologist. The first type of player mentioned merely hits the ball with little idea of what he is doing, while the latter always has a definite plan and adheres to it. The hard-hitting, erratic, net-rushing player is a creature of impulse. There is no real system to his attack, no understanding of your game. He will make brilliant coups on the spur of the moment, largely by instinct; but there is no, mental power of consistent thinking. It is an interesting, fascinating type.

    The dangerous man is the player who mixes his style from back to fore court at the direction of an ever-alert mind. This is the man to study and learn from. He is a player with a definite purpose. A player who has an answer to every query you propound him in your game. He is the most subtle antagonist in the world. He is of the school of Brookes. Second only to him is the man of dogged determination that sets his mind on one plan and adheres to it, bitterly, fiercely fighting to the end, with never a thought of change. He is the man whose psychology is easy to understand, but whose mental viewpoint is hard to upset, for he never allows himself to think of anything except the business at hand. This man is your Johnston or your Wilding. I respect the mental capacity of Brookes more, but I admire the tenacity of purpose of Johnston.

    Pick out your type from your own mental processes, and then work out your game along the lines best suited to you.

    When two men are, in the same class, as regards stroke equipment, the determining factor in any given match is the mental viewpoint. Luck, so-called, is often grasping the psychological value of a break in the game, and turning it to your own account.

    We hear a great deal about the “shots we have made.” Few realize the importance of the “shots we have missed.” The science of missing shots is as important as that of making them, and at times a miss by an inch is of more value than a, return that is killed by your opponent.

    Let me explain. A player drives you far out of court with an angle-shot. You run hard to it, and reaching, drive it hard and fast down the side-line, missing it by an inch. Your opponent is surprised and shaken, realizing that your shot might as well have gone in as out. He will expect you to try it again, and will not take the risk next time. He will try to play the ball, and may fall into error. You have thus taken some of your opponent’s confidence, and increased his chance of error, all by a miss.

    If you had merely popped back that return, and it had been killed, your opponent would have felt increasingly confident of your inability to get the ball out of his reach, while you would merely have been winded without result.

    Let us suppose you made the shot down the sideline. It was a seemingly impossible get. First it amounts to TWO points in that it took one away from your opponent that should have been his and gave you one you ought never to have had. It also worries your opponent, as he feels he has thrown away a big chance.

    The psychology of a tennis match is very interesting, but easily understandable. Both men start with equal chances. Once one man establishes a real lead, his confidence goes up, while his opponent worries, and his mental viewpoint becomes poor. The sole object of the first man is to hold his lead, thus holding his confidence. If the second player pulls even or draws ahead, the inevitable reaction occurs with even a greater contrast in psychology. There is the natural confidence of the leader now with the second man as well as that great stimulus of having turned seeming defeat into probable victory. The reverse in the case of the first player is apt to hopelessly destroy his game, and collapse follows.

     

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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 10:54 PM on December 25, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: , Overhead Smash, , speed, Volley, ,   

    The Volley and Overhead Smash

    The net attack is the heavy artillery of tennis. It is supposed to crush all defence. As such it must be regarded as a point-winning stroke at all times, no matter whether the shot is volley or smash.

    Once at the net hit from the point at the first opportunity given to get the racquet squarely on the ball. All the laws of footwork explained for the drive are theoretically the same in volleying. In practice you seldom have time to change your feet to a set position, so you obviate trouble by throwing the weight on the foot nearest to the ball and pushing it in the shot.

    Volleys are of two classes: (1) the low volley, made from below the waist; and (2) the high volley, from the waist to the head. In contradistinction to the hitting plane classification are the two styles known as (1) the deep volley and (2) the stop volley.

    All low volleys are blocked. High volleys may be either blocked or hit. Volleys should never be stroked. There is no follow through on a low volley and very little on a high one.

    You will hear much talk of “chop” volleys. A chop stroke is one where the racquet travels from above the line of flight of the ball, down and through it, and the angle made behind the racquet is greater than 45 degrees, and many approach 90 degrees. Therefore I say that no volleys should be chopped, for the tendency is to pop the ball up in the air off any chop. Slice volleys if you want to, or hit them flat, for both these shots are made at a very small angle to the flight-line of the ball, the racquet face travelling almost along its plane.

    In all volleys, high or low, the wrist should be locked and absolutely stiff. It should always be below the racquet head, thus bracing the racquet against the impact of the ball. Allow the force of the incoming shot, plus your own weight, to return the ball, and do not strive to “wrist” it over. The tilted racquet face will give any required angle to the return by glancing the ball off the strings, so no wrist turn is needed.

    Low volleys can never be hit hard, and owing to the height of the net should usually be sharply angled, to allow distance for the rise. Any ball met at a higher plane than the top of the net may be hit hard. The stroke should be crisp, snappy, and decisive, but it should stop as it meets the ball. The follow through should be very small. Most low volleys should be soft and short. Most high volleys require speed and length.

    The “stop” volley is nothing more than a shot blocked short. There is no force used. The racquet simply meets the oncoming ball and stops it. The ball rebounds and falls of its own weight. There is little bounce to such a shot, and that may be reduced by allowing the racquet to slide slightly under the ball at the moment of impact, thus imparting back spin to the ball.

    Volleying is a science based on the old geometric axiom that a straight line is the shortest distance between two points. I mean that a volleyer must always cover the straight passing shot since it is the shortest shot with which to pass him, and he must volley straight to his opening and not waste time trying freakish curving volleys that give the base-liner time to recover. It is Johnston’s great straight volley that makes him such a dangerous net man. He is always “punching” his volley straight and hard to the opening in his opponent’s court.

    A net player must have ground strokes in order to attain the net position. Do not think that a service and volley will suffice against first-class tennis.

    Strive to kill your volleys at once, but should your shot not win, follow the ball ‘cross and again cover the straight shot. Always force the man striving to pass you to play the hardest possible shot.

    Attack with your volleys. Never defend the ball when at the net. The only defensive volley is one at your feet as you come in. It is a mid-court shot. Volleys should win with placement more than speed, although speed may be used on a high volley.

    Closely related to the volley, yet in no way a volley stroke, is the overhead smash. It is the Big Bertha of tennis. It is the long range terror that should always score. The rules of footwork, position, and direction that govern the volley will suffice for the overhead. The swing alone is different. The swing should be closely allied to the slice service, the racquet and arm swinging freely from the shoulder, the wrist flexible and the racquet imparting a slight twist to the ball to hold it in court. The overhead is mainly a point winner through speed, since its bounce is so high that a slow placement often allows time for a recovery.

    Do not leap in the air unnecessarily to hit overhead balls. Keep at least one foot, and when possible both feet, on the ground in smashing, as it aids in regulating the weight, and gives better balance. Hit flat and decisively to the point if desired.

    Most missed overhead shots are due to the eye leaving the ball; but a second class of errors are due to lack of confidence that gives a cramped, half-hearted swing. Follow through your overhead shot to the limit of your swing.

    The overhead is essentially a doubles shot, because in singles the chances of passing the net man are greater than lobbing over his head, while in doubles two men cover the net so easily that the best way to open the court is to lob one man back.

    In smashing, the longest distance is the safest shot since it allows a greater margin of error. Therefore smash ‘cross court when pressed, but pull your short lobs either side as determined by the man you are playing.

    Never drop a lob you can hit overhead, as it forces you back and gives the attacking position to your opponent. Never smash with a reverse twist, always hit with a straight racquet face and direct to the opening.

    Closely connected to the overhead since it is the usual defence to any hard smash, is the lob.

    A lob is a high toss of the ball landing between the service-line and the baseline. An excellent lob should be within 6 feet of the baseline.

    Lobs are essentially defensive. The ideas in lobbing are: (1) to give yourself time to recover position when pulled out of court by your opponent’s shot; (2) to drive back the net man and break up his attack; (3) to tire your opponent; (4) occasionally to, win cleanly by placement. This is usually a lob volley from a close net rally, and is a slightly different stroke.

    There is (1) the chop lob, a heavily under-cut spin that hangs in the air. This, is the best defensive lob, as it goes high and gives plenty of time to recover position. (2) The stroke lob or flat lob, hit with a slight top spin. This is the point-winning lob since it gives no time to, the player to run around it, as it is lower and faster than the chop. In making this lob, start your swing like a drive, but allow the racquet to slow up and the face to tilt upward just as you meet the ball. This, shot should seldom go above 10 feet in the air, since it tends to go out with the float of the ball.

    The chop lob, which is a decided under cut, should rise from 20 to 30 feet, or more, high and must go deep. It is better to lob out and run your opponent back, thus tiring him, than to lob short and give him confidence by an easy kill. The value of a lob is mainly one of upsetting your opponent, and its effects are very apparent if you unexpectedly bring off one at the crucial period of a match.

     

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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 9:46 PM on December 25, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: Creating, free Myspace layout, , text, , website   

    Creating a Layout for a Snowboard themed Myspace Webpage

    We have gone a long way in terms of developing things and activities which we can use and enjoy. Snowboarding and Myspace are two examples of such innovations.

    Why would a snowboard enthusiast want to have a Myspace account? For those who are not that familiar with Myspace, it is a system that provides its subscribers with webpages which they can customize according to their specifications up to a certain extent. Al l the accounts are connected to a single worldwide network and it proves to be a great way to be able to find certain people and promote one’s works.

    A snowboarder who would like to meet other snowboarders or other people who are snowboarding enthusiasts can use Myspace as an avenue to do so. Some people will also use the system to be able to promote their snowboarding products and services. Myspace is a very user-friendly system that connects people into a single network.

    What does a normal Myspace webpage contain? It usually contains general information about the subscriber like his name, age, affiliations, occupations, etc. However, one ca n customize his Myspace account to be able to upload other things like animation, music or video.

    So what are some of the important things that one should remember when setting up his snowboarding-themed Myspace webpage? Here are some suggestions:

    -General appeal

    The first thing that you need to be able to know when customizing your Myspace account layout is to determine the general appeal that you would like your website to have. Do you want it to be a website which has a powerful personal appeal or do you want to speak to your visitors in a professional tone? Knowing this will determine the other things that you would like to do in your layout.

    -Background color

    In determining the background color, you should always have the general theme of your website in mind. The colors should never clash against each other, rather, they should complement one another. A snowboarding-themed Myspace webpage should revolve around soothing colors such as white or blue.

    -Text

    The layout of Myspace accounts should maximize the readability of the text that is contained in the said account. It’s all about conveying a message to your visitors and the text should be emphasized. The background colors should not overpower the text color. Of course, substantive content is also important.

    -Other elements

    You can upload video or audio-visual presentations to your Myspace account by customizing the layout. You might want to consider uploading footages of some of your snowboarding escapades. It’s really a great tool to attract more visitors to your Myspace webpage.

    Customizing the layout of a Myspace account can really be tricky. There are some free Myspace layout customizing services that are available in the Internet but they can use your account as a backlink to their own websites and this can complicate things.

    There are free tutorials on how to use the html or what we would call the language of the internet to be able to modify the layout of a Myspace webpage. One can simply cut and paste some of the codes that are provided in the Internet to be able to customize the layout of the page.

    However, if you find these things to be a little bit complicated, you can try to hire a professional to do the job for you. This can cost you a little money, but it saves you the hassle of going through all the nitty gritty details of customizing the webpage.

     

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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 9:46 PM on December 24, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: professional skateboarder, professional skateboarding, skateboarder, ,   

    A Look into Professional Skateboarding

    Skateboarding has become one of the most popular activities of the youth nowadays. It has evolved from being just a rebellious activity back in its older days to a fully-blown extreme sport that it is today.

    According to recent statistics, there are over twelve million skateboarders worldwide and more than 80 percent of these skateboarders are under 18 years old. It has touched the younger markets quite well and has a firm grip on them. Some of these skateboarders skate as a hobby or as a means of transportation, but very few of these skaters go on into the big leagues to become a professional skateboarder.

    The industry of skateboarding is a big one. Armed with a huge market, skateboarding has become a multi-billion dollar industry. The mere fact that it is very popular with the young generations and getting into skateboarding is quite easy, there is a lot of money to be made from selling products, advertising and events organizing.

    What does being a professional skateboarder exactly mean? Well, as in any other sport, going professional means using the sport as a means to earn money. If you get paid for your skateboarding abilities and skills, then you are a pro skateboarder.

    Many of the great skateboarders such as Reese Forbes, Kareem Campbell and Ron Bertino began their careers from humble beginnings. The dynamics of commercialism really gives the much needed financial value to the sport that is skateboarding. But, how does one earn from skateboarding?

    One popular way of earning from skateboarding, as many people would see it, is to join and win skateboarding tournaments. Yes, indeed, there is some money to be made from regularly joining these tournaments and these tournaments provide avenues for skateboarders to be recognized, but in reality, the real money in professional skateboarding does not lie in winning tournaments. The bulk of the money comes from deals arising from the endorsements of skateboarding products.

    The journey of a professional skateboarder would start in the streets, where he would take endless attempts to do new tricks and perform new stunts. These tricks and stunts are to be displayed in tournaments which the different sponsors are carefully keeping an eye on. If a certain company sees a skateboarder with much talent and has a promising career, they would give him free stuff for him to use. This move is also advantageous for the company since the skateboarder will sort of “endorse” their products. When a skateboarder has become a crowd favorite and catches the attention of everyone, then talks are usually made for endorsement deals, and the money will come in.

    Skateboarding shoes and other apparels are the real cash cows in the skateboarding industry and not the skateboards themselves. Actually, other shoe lines have suffered losses because of the rise in popularity of “urban” shoes which cater to the lifestyle of skateboarders.

    If you really love the sport that is skateboarding, you’d probably dreaming of being a professional skateboarder someday. There’s no harm in dreaming such things since being a professional skateboarder can really bring in lots of benefits. Going pro can bring things like money and fame into the table, but at the end of the day, what really matters is that you enjoy what you are doing.

     

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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 10:50 PM on December 23, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: Aikido founder, , concentration, Daito, Daito Ryu Aikijutsu, essence, , , traditional martial arts   

    Knowing the basics of Aikido

    Aikido is one of the oldest form of martial arts. Founded by Morihei Ueshiba, aikido came about through the studies of many different kinds of traditional martial arts. In fact, is often perceived as a form of exercise or a dance because of some of its forms. It is also viewed by some quarters as some form of martial mesmerism.

    Aikido is even confused with Daito Ryu Aikijutsu, it is different in its essence. Still, its founder attributed his creation of aikido to the way, his master Sokaku Takeda, grandmaster of Daito Ryu, opened his eyes to the nature of Budo.

    What is aikido?

    Despite its many perceived forms, aikido is a Budo or martial arts. It is the refinement of the techniques that are being taught in traditional martial arts and is combined with a philosophy that calls on for the power of the spirit. In its essence, it is a blending of the body and the mind.

    Its philosophy is basically derived from the belief that deceptions and trickery or brute force will not make us defeat our opponents. Instead, concentration that involves the spirit will be enough to strengthen us.

    Aikido is also used as a way to discover our true paths so that we can develop our individuality. It also teaches its practitioners to unify their body and their mind so that they will become in harmony with the “universe” and with nature. Their power and their strength will come from this balance and harmony.

    The word “universe” in aikido is not some obscure concept that one cannot achieve. It is actually quite concrete and is even within the grasp of the person. In aikido, “universe” can be achieved through actual experiences and everyday life.

    Aikido’s movements and techniques are circular. When a circle is created in aikido, the person is said to be protected from a collision from an opposing force. A firm center, however, is needed to create this circle. An example of a firm circle is a spinning top that turns at fast speed. Without a firm center, the speed of movement will only create imbalance. The stillness of the spinning top while in speeding motion is what is called sumikiri in Aikido language. This is achieved only by what Aikido founder calls “total clarity of mind and body.” However, this is not so easily achieved. It takes a long time of study and practice in order to find this intense concentration and centeredness.

    Training is important in aikido as well as concentration because while it may be easy to create a centered being when inside a martial arts gym, the same cannot be said of situations and circumstances outside. It will not be easy to keep one’s composure when faced with extraordinary circumstances. This is actually one of the goals of Aikido training. It aims to teach its practitioners to maintain their composure and their centeredness even in panic situations such as danger and calamities.

    One method taught in aikido is to breathe with what is called the seika tanden point. This is the part of the body that can be found two inches below the navel. Controlled breathing is one key to being one with the universe and to center oneself with nature. When a person learns to do this, he or she will feel extraordinary calmness that they can use in the practice of aikido.

     

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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 9:46 PM on December 23, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: heck, , , , skateboards, , study, transportation   

    All About Skateboarding

    Skateboarding is one heck of a craze, especially for the young ones. A recent study estimated that over twelve million people all over the world is involved in skateboarding, and more than one-third of all skateboarders are 18 years old or younger.

    Skateboarding is technically defined as an activity wherein one interacts with a skateboard. A skateboard is a platform with wheels which was originally conceptualized during the 1950s where skateboarding became a pastime for surfers when the waves in the seas were too low.

    During those days, surfers disassembled roller skates and took the wheels and attached them into wooden planks. This idea evolved from the use of what they called the crate scooters, which was basically a transportation and a pastime equipment made from a wooden crate that is attached to some kind of handle bars.

    In the 1960s, skateboarding started to become a craze. Manufacturers sold millions of skateboards which literally resembled surfboards. They marketed skateboards back then as an alternative to surfing. In the 1970s, skateboarding took a more serious turn as the materials for the skateboards were upgraded from wood to more durable and flexible materials. Today, the skateboard is far better than ever before, as millions of dollars flow into researching the best materials and designs to be used in producing them.

    Skateboarding is such an enjoyable and a challenging activity at the same time. Some people use skateboards as a means of transportation. It is a relatively practical way of getting around town because skateboards are so cheap and small as compared to bikes and scooters. One can buy a skateboard at a ridiculously low price, even a kid can buy one from his allowance savings.

    Some people see skateboarding as a serious sport which entails lots of skills and talent. Several international competitions such as the X Games provide venues wherein the best skateboarders in the world can show their stuff. Skateboarding can be easy, but when it comes to executing tricks and stunts, it’s a whole different world all together. One needs the proper training and experience to be able to pull some tricks off.

    If we look deeper into the world of skateboarding, it is definitely more than just a pastime or a sport, there is a culture that seemingly comes along skateboarding. Back in the olden days, skateboarding was primarily associated with the “rebel” culture. Skateboarders were often given the image of being dregs and rebels. However, as time passes by, skateboarding has been considered as a serious activity rather than a manifestation of rebellious angst.

    Learning how to skateboard is usually done in the streets. Most of the successful skateboarders that we have today began their careers spending countless hours of practice on the streets. It’s not that they want to get good at skateboarding, it’s just they enjoy being doing their thing.

    If you, or someone whom you know is interested in skateboarding, there’s really nothing wrong with trying it out. However, there are some serous precautions that need to be taken before engaging in the activity. Having the right protection such as helmets, elbow and knee pads are a must when skateboarding. They may look a little bit bulky, but they will prevent one from having serious injuries in skateboarding. The dangers of the activity are real and should not be taken for granted.

     

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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 10:44 PM on December 22, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , Art of Aikido, , finesse, , , ,   

    The Art of Aikido

    Martial Arts is one of the contributions of Asia to the world. Who can forget Bruce Lee and the fact that he was first and foremost a martial arts athlete before being a movie star? Even until now martial arts is still a big hit with the increasing popularity of Asian movies like crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon and more recently the House of the Flying Daggers.

    The Chinese are the first people that come to mind when it comes to these things but the Japanese are just as athletic with a rich heritage of body contact sports that can be found in their history. The modern Japan still gives honor to these things by holding tournaments and promoting such sports abroad,

    One of these is Aikido. It is interesting to note that the word comes from three Japanese words from which one can derive the meaning of the one word. Ai means joining, Ki means spirit and Do means way. From this we can understand why Aikido is beyond just the physical skills of it students especially sin its proponent Ueshiba focused more on the spiritual and philosophical development of his students.

    In Aikido, one is not taught violence instead one is taught to be in harmony with the opponent to be able to defeat. This might seem odd but it actually works. In approaching an opponent, the aim of the Aikido practitioner is to be one with the opponent to be able to attack him where he is weakest and in doing so diver or immobilize him but never to kill.

    This is where Aikido becomes an art. Art is something beautiful to watch and something positive and Aikido is all that. At least one of the people involved in the fighting strives for harmony and harmony can only be achieved if there is grace in the movements. The moves maybe calculated but there is an air of finesse in doing these movements, not a womanly finesse but just a finesse that emanates peace. The art of peace as what they call in Aikido is one of the most positive influences of Aikido to its students and to everyone who choose to know about this Japanese martial art.

    Some of the techniques in Aikido include the following. Ikkyo is the first technique. Using this technique you control an opponent by using one hand in holding the elbow and one near the wrist, this action is supposed to make you pin your opponent down in the ground. Nikyo the second technique is when you do an adductive wristlock that enables you to twist the arm of your opponent that will in turn cause enough nerve pressure.

    The third technique is Sankyo which is a pronating technique that directs upward-spiraling tension throughout the arm, elbow and shoulder. There are many other techniques but the first three should get you started.

    In studying Aikido, it is important to remember that along with building physical strength to be able to defeat your opponent the mental capacity should also be developed. Just like in any art, it takes a lot of practice and discipline to perfect the art of Aikido. The important thing is the one who wants to get into the art should have determination to give honor to the art by performing it in the best way possible.

     

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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 9:46 PM on December 21, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: , Basics, , , ,   

    Knowing the Basics Skateboarding

    Skateboarding is an easy and fun way to get some exercise, meet a lot of people, and in some sense, to look cool. Some may view it as a fairly risky activity, but a lot of youngster would still prefer to get into it because of its benefits. Majority of skateboarders in the world are 18 and under and this translates to around 10 million young skaters worldwide.

    If you are someone who is interested in skateboarding, then read along for some basic guidance on how to start.

    Protective Gears

    The first things should always come first. Before you go ahead and try to do some stuff using a skateboard, you need to have some protective gears with you. A helmet, a couple of elbow pads and knee pads should do the job. You can borrow some gear from your friends if you are not sure if you’ll push through with skateboarding on the long run, just make sure that they would fit properly on you.

    A lot of kids today disregard the fact that safety is a real issue in skateboarding. They think that wearing protective pads and helmets don’t look cool and so they skate without them but suffering from grave injuries from skateboarding is not so either, huh?

    Meet your new friend: your skateboard

    After putting on your protective gear, the next thing that you need to do is to get acquainted with your skateboard. Skateboards come in different sizes and designs. It is advisable that you borrow a skateboard first so that you can assess what kind of skateboard you would like to have in the future.

    Before you hit the streets with your skateboard, you must find some time to be able to get properly acquainted with it. You should try standing, jumping and moving your feet on the skateboard for some time before you actually make any movements. This will prevent you from being too surprised with the “feel” of the skateboard.

    Stance

    Another important thing that you need to do before you start skateboarding is to determine your stance. If you like the feel of having your left foot forward, then do so, otherwise, put your right foot in front. You can determine which foot goes where by kicking a ball. If you kick a ball with your right, then you should put your right foot at the back of the board and vice versa.

    Movement

    You already know your preferred stance on the skateboard, what do you do next? You push your back foot to get some movement going on. Remember to relax your body while you start off and bend your knees if you have to. The first movements may feel a little bit weird but you’ll definitely get the hang of it.

    Please try to do your initial practice in a place where you have ample space and little disturbance such as vehicles and people. A flat surface is also preferable than sloped ones.

    Halt!

    Another basic thing that you need to know is how to stop. There are different kinds of methods used for stopping a skateboard, however, we would recommend the use of the back foot to stop to stop the movement for beginners. All you have to do is to get your back foot on the ground and use the friction to stop your skateboard.

    These are some of the basic things that beginner skateboarders need to master before they get to the tricks and the stunts. Always remember that safety comes first, and that building sound fundamentals is one’s best weapon to avoid accidents while skateboarding. Enjoy!

     

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  • Toronto Fitness SEO Keywords 11:20 PM on December 20, 2006 Permalink |
    Tags: , Court position, drop, face, , Half Volley, ,   

    Chop, Half Volley and Court Position

    Chop stroke.

    In Tennis, a chop stroke is a shot where the angle towards the player and behind the racquet, made by the line of flight of the ball, and the racquet travelling down across it, is greater than 45 degrees and may be 90 degrees. The racquet face passes slightly outside the ball and down the side, chopping it, as a man chops wood. The spin and curve is from right to left. It is made with a stiff wrist.

    The slice shot merely reduced the angle mentioned from 45 degrees down to a very small one. The racquet face passes either inside or outside the ball, according to direction desired, while the stroke is mainly a wrist twist or slap. This slap imparts a decided skidding break to the ball, while a chop “drags” the ball off the ground without break.

    The rules of footwork for both these shots should be the same as the drive, but because both are made with a short swing and more wrist play, without the need of weight, the rules of footwork may be more safely discarded and body position not so carefully considered.

    Both these shots are essentially defensive, and are labour-saving devices when your opponent is on the baseline. A chop or slice is very hard to drive, and will break up any driving game.

    It is not a shot to use against a volley, as it is too slow to pass and too high to cause any worry. It should be used to drop short, soft shots at the feet of the net man as he comes in. Do not strive to pass a net man with a chop or slice, except through a big opening.

    The drop-shot is a very soft, sharply-angled chop stroke, played wholly with the wrist. It should drop within 3 to 5 feet of the net to be of any use. The racquet face passes around the outside of the ball and under it with a distinct “wrist turn.” Do not swing the racquet from the shoulder in making a drop shot. The drop shot has no relation to a stop-volley. The drop shot is all wrist. The stop-volley has no wrist at all.

    Use all your wrist shots, chop, slice, and drop, merely as an auxilliary to your orthodox game. They are intended to upset your opponent’s game through the varied spin on the ball.

    The half volley.

    This shot requires more perfect timing, eyesight, and racquet work than any other, since its margin of safety is smallest and its manifold chances of mishaps numberless.

    It is a pick-up. The ball meets the ground and racquet face at nearly the same moment, the ball bouncing off the ground, on the strings. This shot is a stiff-wrist, short swing, like a volley with no follow through. The racquet face travels along the ground with a slight tilt over the ball and towards the net, thus holding the ball low; the shot, like all others in tennis, should travel across the racquet face, along the short strings. The racquet face should always be slightly outside the ball.

    The half volley is essentially a defensive stroke, since it should only be made as a last resort, when caught out of position by your opponent’s shot. It is a desperate attempt to extricate yourself from a dangerous position without retreating. never deliberately half volley.

    Court position.

    A tennis court is 39 feet long from baseline to net. There are only two places in a tennis court that a tennis player should be to await the ball.

    1. About 3 feet behind the baseline near the middle of the court, or

    2. About 6 to 8 feet back from the net and almost opposite the ball.

    The first is the place for all baseline players. The second is the net position.

    If you are drawn out of these positions by a shot which you must return, do not remain at the point where you struck the ball, but attain one of the two positions mentioned as rapidly as possible.

    The distance from the baseline to about 10, feet from the net may be considered as “no-man’s-land” or “the blank.” Never linger there, since a deep shot will catch you at your feet. After making your shot from the blank, as you must often do, retreat behind the baseline to await the return, so you may again come forward to meet the ball. If you are drawn in short and cannot retreat safely, continue all the way to the net position.

    Never stand and watch your shot, for to do so simply means you are out of position for your next stroke. Strive to attain a position so that you always arrive at the spot the ball is going to before it actually arrives. Do your hard running while the ball is in the air, so you will not be hurried in your stroke after it bounces.

    It is in learning to do this that natural anticipation plays a big role. Some players instinctively know where the next return is going and take position accordingly, while others will never sense it. It is to the latter class that I urge court position, and recommend always coming in from behind the baseline to meet the ball, since it is much easier to run forward than back.

    Should you be caught at the net, with a short shot to your opponent, do not stand still and let him pass you at will, as he can easily do. Pick out the side where you think he will hit, and jump to, it suddenly as he swings. If you guess right, you win the point. If you are wrong, you are no worse off, since he would have beaten you anyway with his shot.

    Your position should always strive to be such that you can cover the greatest possible area of court without sacrificing safety, since the straight shot is the surest, most dangerous, and must be covered. It is merely a question of how much more court than that immediately in front of the ball may be guarded.

    A well-grounded knowledge of court position saves many points, to say nothing of much breath expended in long runs after hopeless shots.

     

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